Life and Books and Everything
Life and Books and Everything

Episode 10 · 1 year ago

Season 1: Episode 9 - Five Books to Take On a Desert Island, Why The News Makes You Dumb, and Why Politics is the True National Pastime

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Originally released on June 23rd, 2020, Kevin DeYoung, Collin Hansen, and Justin Taylor discuss the five books they would take on a desert island, why the news makes you dumb, and why politics is the true national pastime.

This is life and books and everythinghosted by Kevendy Yang Justin Taylor in colinhanonreadings and salutationswelcome back our faithful listeners, I'm here as usual with Coin Hansonresourceful skywalker, and it is by my picture, hater of humanity. It's just all of the CEVENDYhungstatues have been thrown to the sea in the past week and H: That's okay!They didn't they didn't. Look much like me, anyways good to be with you guys,Um. Let's just try to talk about something very non controversial.Here's my ear's, my question off the Bat Colin. You said this is an aside.Several episodes TAT go. I want to Exporet t with you w all like sports.We talk about sports, you said sports didn't used to be so political yeah andso left, leaning, not leaning, just left right. Oh the S, bs were lastnight. I didn't watch any of it, even in a time when there's actual sportshappening, I don't watch the SBS, because I figure the great thing aboutsports. Is You don't need it in a ward's banquet you play games to tellwho the winner is? We don't eat a red carpet. We don't need to get dressed up.You just decided who who won it, so I didn't watch it, but you know at least two of the host whereMegan Rappino Subird, so therewas going to be celebration of Lgbtq and allsorts of things. So H when did sports. How did this happen because it's not simply the case withsports or at least e SPN, that it's just following the culture? You can saythat now about pride month when Arios- and you know w all these other products arejust you know celebrating Rainbow Month, just seems like the thing everybodyshould do, but some of these sporting organizations or events or agencieswere were not just following culture, but they were shaping culture in acertain way. For certain reasons. When did that happen? How did thathappen? Why did it happen? What are your thoughts Callin? I was thinking about this this weekendactually, and I think our original American sport is politics. I think our country has been alwaysabsolutely enthralled with politics Um. I think Youcou go back to the earliestdays, the colonial days and Cevin. This is where you're the expert, but I thinkUm there's just always been a a pole in that direction. To a certain extent andculturally speaking, I think there's it's hard to resist that, and I thinkthis is what the key was. The key was to switch to the Internet and what the Internet has done is. Itis really fragmented audiences, in so many different directions, and so, butin fragment in the audience, it's actually forced other audiences sort ofother media to be able to consolidate. So, let's think about this, O SportsCenter v En the nineteen nineties you're watching sports center, its theonly place for you to get all of this news before the newspaper comes out thenext day, then you're looking for comprehensive coverage, you want toknow what happened. You Know Young Collin, Hanson and Southdakotaon. Thefarm wants to know the score of the royals Indians game and and he's going to wait to watch andhe's going to be mad if he doesn't get to see highlights from his favoriteteam, the royals. Well, of course, nobody would think this way anymore,because you're watching the game live, you can get live highlights on twitter.You can get it on your AP and so and then you can watch M B network andthey're going to do libreak INS and...

...live games, and things like that. Sowhat it's done to the sort of broadcast media or big cable media, as it'spushed them into sort of trying to get the largest audience segment possible,and so that's, for example, reason why you see other sports like baseball,fall away, while the NFL rises? That's why you see, like other teams fall, butthen you see the cowboys come. I I think a turning point, at least in myviewership was the obsession with trrell owens when he played for theDallas Cowboys. It's like they just could not get enough l. He saw theridersin his sock, it's I know tthe moment I remember guys, do youremember when he did situps in his driveway and it was broadcast live Imean I do tat. Often no one pays attention carrits off everything, noKyowars, that's right! So there was, there was adistinct shift at that time and then all of a sudden, then you get you getbetter feedback in terms of what people are willing to watch and I think what people realize thatthey wanted to watch, and this goes back to H. Pardon the interruption goesback to first take and then y Yoban to see that overtake a lot of the sportsbroadcast shows. Then, of course, you can see, skip bayliss becomes a bigpart of this M Stethena Smith and you start to see wait a minute. Why iseverything in sports set up between a black guy and a white guy? And why arewe not talking about the sports anymore? Why do we keep talking about the issues? I think our original national sport ispolitics. It's arguing- and I think that's why People Watch Fox News, andso I could combine that with some views on journalism, because it's like thenewswriters they've flipped completely in bill. Simmons is one of them and heis written about this they've published on this. I think at the ringer of howthats happened in the last fifteen years, but I think the biggest changeis that the Internet, fragmented markets and then forced consolidationaround the sort of base approach, which is get people angry. That's what themost people want to watch go political and that's true across all mediaplatforms. If you have free networks- and you get your news for that halfhour time slot now it was slanted to to the left. It wasn't completely objective, but there was asense of you had to appeal to middle of the road. You you, youcouldn't appeal to just a niche where nobody is getting a big market share. Imean the the most watch. Programs are in the millions, not in the tens ofmillions, and so you don't have to appeal to a broad segment, and I thinkthen part of it must be that those who- and this is the productof larger cultural trends and calling you talk about journalism or just whogets into media or WHO's, and then it becomes self perpetuating the sort ofpeople like them who get in. If you don't even know anyone whothinks differently than you on the topic Dozour, whether it's sexualmatters or whatever, you are not going to try to presentboth sides because, as far as you know, no reasonable rational person reallythinks differently, and so you can trafficexclusively in self. Congratulations because you're not aware of any realperson who thinks differently. So you don't have to be broad and you don'treally have to try to convince Peope. I got a few more thoughts, O go jump inJustin. Is it still surprising to you guys that they were able to pull off akind of a progressive agenda with a largely conservative audience? I mean Y,you think, of a typical, a guy who...

...watches Monday night football.obsessively you don't think of him. As your flaming liberal, I in speakingbrodly. I guess still surprised, even given everything that you said, that the conservative audience basicallystood with increasingly left leaning reporters herway, but did they so isn't that the whole point of the Capernick situation?So I think the only league that truly survived to t to stand astride ourpolitical divides was the NFL. So in the middle of this baseball hascontinued a pretty long standing decline. Baseball's audience is as oldwhite male. U and so generally. Conservative golf is pretty similarcollege. Football has an extremely conservative fan base, very regional,especially in the Midwest in the south. The NBA has moved in an explicitly veryprogressive urban direction. That's been long standing, but especially inthe last fifteen years or so, and the N, I think, was the last league thatreally was trying to sort of be across all of America and that's why the flagthing I I mean the widespread response from my conservative friends,especially people that I grew up with was they were so angry? They wouldnever watch the NFL again. I doubt they followed through on that, and I got toadmit that it didn't make a lot of sense to me. I didn't understand that,but I was really surprised that that was the way I saw a lot of fans respondand we saw the ratings did dip that year, though, the thought is the onereason they probably dipped is because of a lot of interest in the electionoin sixteen election, it probably wasn't so much capernick. It was thatpeople were watching political entertainment. Instead in Callin youpointed about politics, our national pastime. I would have to know another country well enough to know inwhat ways America is unique, but maybe someone from Canada seems like they wouldn't say howour elections are Kevin. Well, yes, I know at my point, was going to behistorically, you see it. Somebody recently made the point. We have beenthrough these cultural heavals before where there is a crusade of righteousness. That will well will admit no dissenting opinionand looking back, we can see some of them. We like some of them. We didn'tlike so where it might have been in thegreat awakening might have been evangelicalism or in the nineteenthcentury, Rabs abolitionism, the beginning of the twentieth century.Prohibition I mean there is an example. If you are a righteous person y you'renot for drunken this are you you have woinly, remember Billi Sunday,aaratsball player was one of the leading. I was going to say just toclarify one thing: Iwas saying earlier: Seventy two Olympics, of course majorpolitical Mohammed, a Le All sorts of stuff there. But then you revert toJordan. I do think we've entered into a different thing. Sorry, just I wasthinking there about prohibition, part with the Yia just saying you havelonely Macon Jgreshamatian, who you know sayshe's not going to h. You can't pass vote for a resolution.That's going to explicitly indorsed the volstead act because he doesn't thinkthat he has the ability, as a minister, to say that the Bible compels them todo so. It's extremely unpopular decision to make so, on the one hand,yes, we shouldn't be surprising with whether we think they're, righteous orthey're, half righteous or they're mistaken. These sort of totalizingcampaigns, moral campaigns. We have always been a relentlessly moral people, the th,the brief interlude of Relativism, was trying to brokeher some negotiation. I think onthe left, when they felt like the right...

...was still ascendent and now that therights or traditional, whatever you call, it is no longer ascendant. All ofthose claims for relativism are gone h. How do you guys calculate the the issue? So just takethe that sports and ESP N in particular, youknow fully behind I mean th y. They were ahead of the curve in giving Brucegener calls himself Katelan Genner. You know the the courage award h was that the year where they boughtthey they bought it or whet. It was paid for in return for the a BC newsexclusive ie jns back to back, where somebody won the arthrash courage awardfor being lbtq, and I think one of them was, I think, maybe it was that yearthey had to give the award in exchange for the interview firm Ember correctly.So why? WHY THAT ISSUE WHA? Why do the liberal elites- and it sounds like I'mgoing on- of rant ere, but don't I don't use that redunantly, but whywould those media outlet sports in particulargravitate toward that constellation of issues? In wanting to champion their version of the good, therighteous and the beautiful, why not something else? How do you make sense of it? Justin? I really don't know. The only thingthat comes immediately to mind is that is the issue of the hour. That's theleading edge of what is progressive and right, and whatever the opposite of being in theANDERTHEL, is to be an enlightened person in the twenty first century tobe free of bigotry and prejudice and H, free from animous and hatred ofhumanity. This is this is the the place that you have to land Um and you know, what's especiallystriking is what a world view of contradictions it is. Imean if anybody should be pushing back against trancitors, it should be peoplein sex, specific sports Um. You know the the W MBA should be flatlyagainst trengenderism if there's any sort of logical consistency andcoherence to a world view, but of course it's not so you know sociologically, I don't knowthe answer to the question. Theologically I mean t hat's, that's atthe heart of of who we are when we're in rebellion against God, when we don'thave a transcendent got above and we don't have a functioning anthropologythat understands the goodness of God's design. We just end up in a mess of ofabsolute contradiction. That makes no sense, but everybody thinks it'sabsolutely correct. So again, sociologically, I don't understand it,and people smarter than me can put those pieces together. Theologically. Iguess it. It makes a bit more sense. That's good, Colin ar are you the thesmarter person to Kno yether? No, definitely not! I will m what I willsay and I mean you could apply a little bit of a economic analysis to say theobvious, which is they wouldn't do it unless they made a money. So, at some level the success of thegayrights movement is tied to the fact that they have convinced corporateAmerica that the only way to be able to make the most amount of money is bygoing all in, which is why we see all the logos and rainbows this year. I wasactually readining t an article that Wheatan Illinois now most of thebusinesses ore, many businesses or something like that. Now Have Gay PrideFlags Out Front for Pride Month, which obviously is a big shift from fiveyears ago, let alone ten years ago or twenty years ago there. So at somelevel Um, I mean it' sort of it suits...

...capitalism. To do so, a another level Iwould say just looking back sociologically on the profession of ofmedia sports media before the nineteen eighties, it was aworking class profession. You didn't go to college to write about sports sincethe nineteen eighties, you do and you go to certain Um, certain schools thatwere main unnamed and H and there. You know private liberaluniversities, and these are the kinds of graduates that they produce, and soI think also at some level, Um Journalism and broadcasting, broadlyspeaking since the nineteen seventies, so that would kind of fit within my myparadime here and well I mean it goes back early into the mccraking period, hearly twentieth century, but Um. I think sports is seen as being tritecompared to the big issues of our day, and so I think, there's an inferioritycomplex that comes with sports broadcasters and journalist. That says,if I really want to be see doing something important with my life, Ineed to see sports as a kind of utility toward accomplishing that end of socialjustice, and so I think all of that has is made for a pretty profound changebut again and I wan TA. Let me give a contemporary example on this. Thisworks in multiple directions in multiple Um weighs both negative andpositive. There's not only a negative to this. A positive to this is that I'min Astate, where, with our second most famous sport, NASCARTaladega, we're talking right now during that race and Um, where we had anoose that was hung in the garage of an African American driver Um, and thatkind of thing in one sense does not really surprise, and then this is howall things come: Full Circle, the? U S, Senator from Alabama, has to go on Paul.Fine bombs. Sports show to talk about this, but anyway, so I would just say thewhen we look back historical on the lestape between politics and sports. It's always been there. I think it'saccelerated. A lot of it is bad, but some of it is good because I sure amglad that people are speaking up, including journalists and they're, notsaying hey. We don't talk about. We don't talk about politics when it comesto hanging nooses in black drivers, garages with Nascar, so mix Dag. For meright. No, I agree. It is a mixed bag. This thisw'LD be my quick three prongedtheory, not just for sports, but just the advocacy for lgbt in particular, but could be othersort of social justice issues. I think one we we live in a country and at atime where it it can seem as if suffering is unusual. That is, we are not surrounded. There's all sorts of examples, ofcourse we're all bad things are like, but I mean uh children aren't dying allthe time. Women don't usually pass away in childbirth. We all have stories ofcancer in our lives and our families, but I mean in a historical sense thesort of grinding poverty that most people have lived in. That's most of usare living the sort of things that would cut you off at the knees in earlyage, we're not having life spans to the eighties, so one you live in a time.We're suffering then I's, not what is to be expect. It's unusual. So SecondProng, therefore, is those occasions of exquisite suffering genuine at timesperceived at other times a get our attention NDSO, I think the Matrix, though nobodyis spelling it out like this in a kind...

...of syllogism when it comes to what sort of things do we think we cansafely promote parade. I think it has to be someone orsomething that involves suffering or victim hood andkid t at could begenuine. You see it. My family watches American into warrior. You show Mo ofthose those people, you know, there's some story of suffering: they'redamnthe Olympic Ti Tom Renaldi, one of my favorites every college gameday. Soit's you know, Jonathan Heights, moral matrix that it's h suffering inparticular it's a cresh in arm and harm. So so suffering is unusual. So wegravitate to the these stories of suffering then seem unusual and and onthe good side, we're particularly compassionate to them. On the morecynical side, we could say that we we find that there's great virtue inplatforming them, but then there's the third component, because it isn't thatall kinds of suffering I mean you're, not going to see the SBS talk about mthe cakemaker who lost his job. So it's suffering that is either at the the agent of the suffering iseither faceless or the culturally repugnant other. So this is wheresports will see if this changes in the years ahead has been for the last years,Um very traditional comes to the military, very supportive, the flyovers,the the big unfurling of the flag. Of course, Kelinccon CAPERNECK has changesthe dynamic of that oftot paid for by the military pay for prioritary and OToccurding tool. Yes- and you know it's not unheard of for all sorts of- showsto do the video of a soldier who's reunited with a family member. That's,but it's not the soldier as a soldier as a warrior is, is as a sufferer andso and that's okay, because it's it's rather nameless faceless. So it eithermust be it's sort. They suffer from cancer theyr away from their family inthe military, or this suffering comes at the hand of the culturally repugnantother, which is why you're likely not to see some big campaign for theweagers in China. That's going to cost the NBA some moneyif they do that or there's a face to it. That's sort of that. That's notsupposed to be the team that we're against or if Moslems were theperpetrators of some oppression, but if it seemed tocome from Christians from conservatives in somecircles, fr m from Jews from anyone who is considered to be theoutgroup from our group. So you get those three factors and I think it justit goes through, and it makes sense that, of course, we would promote andcelebrate this and it feels like we have nothing to GTO lose and we onlyhave to gain and maybe there's a genuine sense of compassion and careabout the issues. But it may just be a way to to to thumb our fingers in someoneelse's eye. I mean that's a lot of what goes on is both the right and the left,but performative pieces that are ways of making a point that show the moralinferiority of the other side. Yeahi think you're ex, I think, you'reexactly right cabin. I think I vote for you as the smart one of the group. Iknew I was going to Av the question yeah. I agree. I agree Um. I it still seems to me with all ofthat said, which I think is absolutely...

...spot on D and really insightful. Itstill seems to me like something: That's fundamentally, abstract like easily approved in theory, Harderanpractice. It's one thing for Bruce Jenner, who's, this older retired guy.I don't know how fast he can even run the mile another thing if lobranannounce that heis transitioning joining the WNBA, W, NBA and ou wantsto give it a shot, see if he could make it in the women's League. I mean what would happen in that kind ofscenario. To me, it still feels like it's it's this thing that feels greatto affirm in theory, but when you actually get down to it and a man can break every woman's recordand dominate a sport. I don't know what would happen in that kind of thought.Experiment So, Colin. This ties in with this discussion, but transitioning justa bit. How does the news make us dumb I've read about that before JoeCarter's written about it? Maybe you guys have too there as a book by JohnSomerville, how the news makes us dumb, ivp published ABAC, Inn, nineteen,ninety nine, all the examples would be of the news- would be woefully out of date, which sort ofproves his point. I S! That's one of the points in the book. Is You readsomething in the paper online? You think I'm up to date. I know what'sgoing on in the world, you come back six days later, let alone six monthslater. Most of it is what. Why were we talking about thatagain m and this plays into our current cultural upheaval intentions and whyreal episodes of injustice turn into Nassive cultural conflagrations withreal world consequences? What role does the news play in that and how are wesusceptible to it as Christians? What do you think Callin? Well, people are not familiar with theconcept of pseudo events. Would encourage them to look up Joe carterswriting on this for the Gospel coalition well elsewhere. It's onething that we we try to avoid at TGC, though a lot oftimes we we get sucked into it, just like everybody else, because it's thething that people want to talk about, but I don't know if I'd say the vastmajority, but like a lot of the things that you encounter in the news simplyare only like: it's like the Cardashians whet 're, just Gonto talkall about Birshgenner and the Canatians, apparently today, they're famous,because they're F famous for being famous it's news, because it's news, Um,there's no actual connection to it. There's no necessary there's! No therethere there's no connection to what is going on in your life. I think, if Iwanted to borrow from from Rosoufit here, I say it some level. I it's asign of decadence, it's a sign of affluents, it's a sign of leisure thatwe have enough time that we can engage in these kinds of pursuits of endlessdiscussion about things that sometimes they definitely do matter andoftentimes th y. They don't. You cannot really explain how they do, and so theconcept of a pseudo event is in something. That's I mean for anexample. It would be. I don't know if you guys saw this Washington Post piecerecently, where they were talking about a black faced costume from severalyears ago, m that that was not intended to be offensive,but of course it was black face. So it was offensive. I to a big problem atthe Party and apologies all over the place and people storming out Gin, acollection of Washington, post reporters. So Anyway, in this majornewspaper, then recirculated. I think it was four years later. Three yearslater, I think the journalist says something like recently surfaced thisyou're like wait, a minute who recently surfaced this rigt. You did by writingabout it right now, so there's Um,...

...there's also a Um. This is funnySupreme Court Law for journalists, but goes back to New York time an Alad. Allof this can be funny. No well a m. You can lie about any public figure in theUnited States. If, if that person's, a public figure in print, it'sconstitutionally protected to lie about them, you have you can make stuff up.You can an that's why we have tablois and things like that, its verydifficult to sue successfully in the United States different in Britain, butit's different here, but here's the thing: how does somebody become apublic figure because you write about them, so it's a catch. Twenty two for peopleyou right about them to make them public figure. Then you can say whatyou want about them, because now they're, a public figure, that's theway our media works, and so suto events are are similar to that. I'm talkingabout this because- and I think just one because I'mtalking about it- I think there's one thing just to to keep in mind that D. Isay this all the time with breaking news: Um, Cable News, wherever else you'relooking, they have to fill the time broadcast so whether nothing happensthat day or the whole world is up in flames, he's going to be the sameamount of time that they have to fill for their show. So if there's no news, they'll make itup and not only amount of time, but theyhave to speak in such a way that keeps you on a ot to keep to Gep oing back Yoater. Disagree this, which y? U You just you can feel your just despite your knowledge and yourbest attempts, you feel your poll starting to raise and they ca. I haveto find that out. That's that's going to change everything, and I can'tbelieve this would happen. It's worth pointing out too that this is not theSudo event. Thing is not something that came along in two thousand and sixNinean or nothing o e Daniem birsting. I think it was nineteen sixty twopublished the book, the Image Guide to pseudo events as history, somethinglike that for the title, Um speaking politically about America andidentifying that Qoining at least that terminology of Sotol events. I astthat's nearly sixty years ago now ye and think about how much the news, whether it's mainstreampapers or just your social, immediate feed, convinces us that we know what's going on. This isone of the the beally things about Somerville's book. He says: Okay,you're, gon, t you're going to say. Well. If I don't pay attention to thenews, I won't know what's going on, and he says you don't know. What's going on yeahthere's, there's you'll find out who, on you know, who's the new president oryou'll, find out who one the sports game you care about, but that's part ofthe illusion of how the news makes us. Don't you think you now know what ishappening in a country of three hundred and thirty million people, so I youguys know I was thinking about writing about this. I I may not post it, butjust to talk about the juxaposition of these headlines here in Charlotte. Youmentioned so big banner and the Charlotte Observer homepage was thisstory about bubble Wallace and the news found in his garage stall, and that'sthat's no worthy. That's who, whoever did it should be denounced and shouldface whatever criminal penalties are available. For that sort of thing. Imean it, it's shameful that that would happen above that. A lesser news story was thefact that two people twelve killed twelve peopleinjured in a shooting in a neighborhood in Charlotte's last night for anongoing June teenth celebration, and the first thought was: Oh, my t is this: This going to be GeorgeFloyd all over again. This is going to...

...be absolutely horrible and they don't.They don't have a suspect. Last. I checked, they said, there's fourhundred witnesses and they don't have any leads, but there was a marchearlier this afternoon. Let up by you know, group of protesters with UH black lives matter, Hash Tag, but oneof the flyers said black lives won't matter to them. If they don't matter tous, and one of the the neighborhoodcouncilmen has said this is not reflective of who we are is a community.So all of that I take to mean that it, it seems that it was someone fromwithin the community Um an African American shooting into a crowd a therewere dozens of shots fired. So I don't know what all the details will be.That's a horrible incident. My contention is that neither of those,if that, if it turns out to be a white person who put the noose in bubble,Wallace's stall, it turns out to be a black person who is shooting up thisparty, for whatever reason I don't think either of those events should bedeterminative of what we think about black people or white people. I knowthat may sound controversials not to discount history and real problems, but it is to say that the the news will will shape in time how we view these things, andit doesn't take very many in in a a country. That's a countinent wide andthree hundred thirty million people, whether it's with school shootings oryou know, if you hear of every hurricane that comes or everytinsuddenly, you think everything is worse than it ever was well we're moreaware of things. It's not discounting where things may be worse, but actuallythe news tends to exaggerate. The state of problems exaggerate current dangers,because you know headlines of good people, helping other people, don'tdrive traffic headlines of natural disasters. Tensions problems hugeissues, especially as they fit in with H, narratives that are unfalsifiable,they can perpetuate and they can have real world consequences. I mean I, Ishudder to think not only 'cause t it it's wrong and sinful, but if thatepisode in Charlotte had been the act of white supremacy mean h, the city would be on fire meanliterally, it would be, it would be horrible, and I don't think I think thenews, whittingly or unwintingly gives then power to the bad people instead ofthe good people m, the bad people, you do your act of violence and we willwrite at large and everyone will respond to it. PUSHBACK, I know there'slots of nuances and Cavias with that, but it's a real issue and we're kiddingourselves. If we think wor, I mean you put a camera on every single person inthe country. If you knew everyone's word thoughts and deeds, it could be apretty distopian picture. That would reinforce any worse case scenario. Youcould draw up and it will begin to have if it dosn't already some real worldconsequences which could be very ugly. I may even shared this on this podcast.I can't remember, but one example that I will often cite to explain. This camefrom my speaking up at Um ut, an Ivy League School Cornell, Um toa Christian Union group, and I was meening with the student O hi was twothousand and sixteen election and I was asking them questions 'cause. I wasworking on a book on the time on...

Politics and religion and race, and Iasked them what is your average cornell student think about Christianity andthey all responded the same way. These are Christian students, evengelicalstudents. They responded the same way. They said they think Um. You know theythink of Um the Wy, my blanket on the Baptis, her AAT Tobapti right, okay and I just said: okay, so overgrown family Kansas cult stands in for two thousand years of thelargest religion in the world. Three hundred thousand churches yet andthere's only one way to explain how that happens, and that's through thepower of media in their news not to be able to feature the the odd, and Iwould go so far as to say d. This would be a whole another discussion we couldtalk about, but I think the whole sort of underlying premise ofjournalism makes it unstable for Christians and actually think the academy ispretty similar to this. I don't think it's a surprise that this goes bad forOrthodox Christians with both media, as well as with the academy, because thevery premise is, it must be new. It must be different. That's what makessomething newsworthy it has to be unusual and if it bleeds, it leads anditbleads, at least so. So in the academy, it's the same thing you getpublished because you generally have done something: that's new anddifferent. That's overturned to previous consensus. I think weundersell that the very professional premisies that we buy into are very difficult to hold for OrthodoxChristians in a stable way. Just and I don't know any thought S, I'minteresting a whole different, controversial topic there, but I thinkit's connected to what Kevin's talking about. I think what of the things that Kevinsaid is that you know we don't have sort of private cameras into everysingle person's home into every single person's thoughts, and even if we did,how could you process all of tha information? Millions of people rig, soit seems like there's only two recourses, broadly speaking, the twoextremes. Are you get all of your knowledge by anecdote or you get all ofyour knowledge by statistics, and most of us are eyes glaze over withstatistics. It feels kind of cold and heartless, and we all just know thatyou can manipulate statistics and make them Sey anything you want and then onthe other hand, if you're, just relying on anticdote like most of us, live injust one city, we're not cosmopolitan travelers, we don't know hundreds ofthousands of people, we know hundreds of people at most, and so neither ofthose seem like very tenable ways to reach definitive conclusions aabout,something as big as our country is so it makes sense to have something like anews outlet that can speak authoritatively. For us, I mean, Ithink, back to myself as a a kid in the nineteen eighties,watching Dan Raher and Peter Jennings and Tom Broka on t v. those were thethree guys and they kind of had that Voice of God. Ora, and I remembersitting there whatever great. I was in third grade or fourth grade thinking,if only I could know as much as Dan. Rather he knows about everything heknows. HOS All these countries he's a great newsreader. He reads so well nobut. I really did think that like, ifI could someday attain to that level of knowledge about politics and history,he just seems like he knows everything he doesn't miss a beat. Ioes say youknow, I haven't really thought about that, or I'd need to study that morethere. There really is a voice of God, Ora that comes with journalism, and Ithink at some level it feels reasonable. You know here's somebody who Um, who has the resources to go out and asklots of people. They have the resources to go and ask the very best experts.They write better than I do they're smarter than I am they're bettereducated than I am. They can put all...

...these things together and tell me theway things really are, and of course now news has become so parti that youcan choose. Even if you know that, intellectually, that you know there'sgood guys and badguys now you can choose just the good guys. You onlywatch your Fox News. You only watch your MSN OBC news and yeah. It's it's deeply problematic. Iwish that there was a place or good journalism, because, theoretically, itshould play a really vital role in our republic and I think it it still can,but the way of which we can be manipulated of what are the issues weshould care about. How should they be framed? Um It just feels really problematic in andCollin knows it's better than anyway. I mean really good. Journalism takes along time. It's a lot of work mean when, when did that article come out aboutthe Malaysian Air, Oh, that thing was amazing. His it was his think it was ahe who wrote it theory. I mean that was a lot of research. That was an amazingpiece of journalism, trying to explain how that happened, but that doesn'tcome in the moment. It's not the way. The business model really we're O. It's,not your Wan, O business model that that's going to get your clicks, andyou said it exactly right. Just in I mean we can't just shape the world by eitherof those two things I mean, I I love charts and numbers and statistics. Ihave the latest big book of Statistil, a statistical, abstract, tof, theUnited States, which tells you all sorts of fascinating things, and Ithink we ought to have that sort of birds, eye view to make sense of theanecdotes and y. You can't pastor people by statistics and all of us, every single one of us are making. Wecan't help we're generalizing creatures. We have to make sense of the world thatwe live in, and so we base some of that upon a lot of that upon what we see andwhat our experiences have been. There's nothing that's going to stop that fromhappening, nor should it on one level. We simply need to be aware that th, the media is one huge shapingagent of that and it's not without its own passions and agendas. I mean inthis book Somerville Says The News Exaggerates the extent of disaster inthe world. The news entices us to overreactions the news overemphasizes,the role that government plays in our lives because think about how much ofthe news is about politics. I mean it reinforces because it's sport, becauseit's a sort, that's tru it it matters it it's a game. That's I mean peoplehave pointed this out for years. Most of the post debate. Commentary frompresidential debates are about Y W, who won how they do. Who looked this mostof the commentary on the campaign itself are horse race issues, who's upwho's down. It is it's covered like a sport, and even for the Conservativeswho say part of their their world view is limited government when you injestso much news that is relentlessly focus on politics. It it it convinces you that what happens in Washington reallyis the most important and really should be the most important and h. You knowto u: One of our politicians I mean Ben Sass is often pointing people, hiswritten senator from the Great State of Nebraska, pointing out that thatshouldn't be that's not the way that the political structure of our countryI it should be that your local family and church and even local elections,are much more important than that. But everything in the news screams at us. The government is sould is massivelyimportant in your life, should be important in your life and is probablythere to fix the problems in your life. YWE'RE RVERY, religious country, we'revery religious country, and you will not find religion covered on theevening news unless it's something to...

...do with Olatics are controversial. Iwits a huge parti lives or unless something goes bad yeah it just andleyeah, exactly which even does the Axualness Book Talk About News, or isit not focusd on that? I I just order the book today, but I haven't read yyet Hon Rosstlins Yeah I've read about it. I haven't read facts on thisseither. I I'm the only one. I think here's read that I'v Read Greg EasterBooks Book from a year or two ago about samekind of idea on. What's the title, though, why why everything is gettingbetter though it doesn't seem like it is? Is the big idea of the book doesFactfulness Talk About Media Colin Yeah? I can't remember the specifics there,but again what I want to riterate is that, no matter how much better things get news media with the way it's set up,will continue to portray things as bad and getting worse is the entirefoundational premise to news judgment and at one level it's KINDOF ChristianN, as you imagine, you know, as I've getten an eagerness for the coming ofthe Kingdom of Christ. U Now an an impatience with this world as it is, but that's probably being overlygenerous thinkit some level it's just we tend to be. I mean I talk about this.All the time N T I in a book that I'm working on now fear and loathing are what sell sell us in media. Not Fer, not faith,an Love B. Love don't get headlines so so as we transition to a a cheeriertopic, our last topic, but I want to spendsome time here 'cause. This is a fun question for you about books, Youe'Veall, K, Ow, we've all got thequestion: What Book would you bring with you if you're stranded on adeserted island? I want a newance that a little bit okay, you guys get fivebooks, the Bible's already there in fact, justin it's a really robust, esvstudy by H, n. In fact, maybe we'll we'll makeit an ESV interlineear. So you already have Greek and Hebrew there. Is You gota Bible, let's not say an island, what whatever you're preferred if it's anisland, if it's a chateau in the mountains, this is not punishment andyou're, not they're, not there forever. So you don't have to bring theshipmakers guide or how to build radios out of cocoa nuts you're going to be there six months,you'R Maroone, you're, you're, you're locked away for six months, we'll makeit somewhat enjoy ' enjoy Y. You can have some food provided for you. Infact, it's not solitary confinement. You get O see our your family from timeto time. Okay, so we're making this a good case scenario, but you're you'reaway for six months. You've got a Bible. You got all this time. You have noobligations, no responsibilities, you're, just ' You're going to read,and you know, train for triathalons. No doubt what five books are you bringing withyou and H will allow that if it's a multivolume you know they just couldn'treally print the whole book in one binding. Will let you bring that, butyou can't bring a set. You can't bring the complete works. Sot John O Wanandcount at his one book, so re do five. At a time. Let's go around okay, like adraft yeah we'RE GOING TO DO WELLOKAYSO! Here's, Here's mine, my first one isactually very easy. I'd think hard about theother ones, but I would bring a hymnal. Oh that's a good one. I would bring theTrinity Hymnal. It has the Westmiser Confession and catechisms and E. Ithought it was going to be e minute, so the Westminster Si did think about that.CTA wrank you, but him now, I'm going to want to singthat's going to nourish my soul. So whenever people ask me that questionit's easy, the first one is is Ahymnocolin. What's your what's yourfirst pick in t the marooned book draft?...

Okay? Well, just because you startedout on a very pious note and most of mine are not that way, then I'llcontinue in that theme the letters of John Newton, I man- I want to be like John Newton,when I grow up in Christ, Um that just that that stirs my soul right there. Soafter Hims John Newton, but again that's going to be the last of my piouspicks. Okay, Justin do we have looss Bible software or d?No, NO DONDO! You don't have you don't have a computer, you don't have accessto the internet or vital softhware Andin Oselly would kill this questionwith his. Would Twenty Thousand Bucks Onalatop Yeah, I'm not as pious as you guys, Iguess uh the city of God by Augustine wdid you just make that up. Did youfeel like you had to say that or you were going to say, city of God, youcouldn't bring all of all IER Odoniman's works or Michael Oakshot, orsomebody or okay city of God. That was that wasactually on my short list of possible in Latin andn. No, I s of God. THAT'S TOO V! I guessit was it's one volume at ten volumes had, I think too marinate in anotherworld and to spend time with somebody like Augustine in his beautiful mind, Tto get inside somebody from that many centuries ago who thought differently,um all sorts of things that we woulddisagree with, but the ability to speak thousands of yearslater, m thousand and a half years later too, contemporary withContemporary Relevance and Power To have mastered Dhebt book would feellike it would be worth my six months in the chateau very good okay next round,and I was tha. That was a a strong possibility for me. So I'm going toleave that out. So next, I think in categories afterthe hymnol I want some dense books. I want books,probably that I've read or I'm familiar with 'cause. I want to be sure thatthey're going to be useful, I'm GOINNA like them. I don't want to take anychances, so I definitely need a multivalume of syssematic theology. Thequestion is which one and there's a lot of strong contenders.You can't go wrong with bobbing, I'm imtemtdd for a Brocco there's such a apiety to his work, but I have to take Turitin, not a surprise. It's it's! Soit's difficult! It's dense! It's layered! I just feel like I I can spend months in here and be learning allsorts of new things. Take lots of notes, so I want to get do a deep dive intosysematic theology and I'll go with Turriton call 'em whith your next pick.You know, as I was thinking about this question, I realized that I almostexclusively read for intellectual and moral improvement, which generally isprobably pretty good right, but I didn't really take your question thatway. I guess I kind of assumed I was going to be stranded here for the restof my life Gongto, be I wasn't going to be comingback well, you can still have fun, but yeah Y U're you're coming back. Okay.Well, I didn't think about it. That way, so I really didn't think in terms ofmoral improvement. I really thought in terms of what I would enjoy topicallyand also just quality of writing. Um, and so my next one is going to be g,these are all going to be weird, Barbara Tuckmans guns of August. Well,I've heard H, t that's a very garmook GE, entertainment, but entertainment ofjust like this world. Changing variety like. Are you serious? This allactually happened. How could nobody...

...have stood up and stopped this? That is a WHO. That is a a page Turner.If you love a if Yeu loves some history, so Barbar Tuckmans guns of August, howing I've actually got two susemetictheologies on mine, but the motavolume? I think I'm going to go with BAVIC.Okay, I think to get the the learned, theology andhistory in there, but something that's also going to keep me oriented toward piety and worship and not just go off and and learning moreabout a different classic categories without th the heart application aswell. So abrocco may have been a good one as well, but Ovit comes to mind for me, you don'tthink Turreton has the heart application out justin give him a chance man. I know Ineed to get back to Touriton. No, I understand you know badly. I won't notto complain with that choice at all. You have 't memorized Sai, don't youDurrinton? Don't you you're caticatical an yeah, ide, large arts, large parts,not not lat, yet kake round three books on our Mountain Chateau, I'm still I'mstill needling through some options here, but another category. This isvery cliche but okay, so I want to bring a fiction book, a I'm all bymyself. I want something that brings me to another world expands my creative horizons, just n. If we had more orComlon, if we had more time I'd, let you try to convince me of you know something by dusty evski orsome. You know classic piece of Russian literature, orI didn't even include any of that. Okay or my wife would have me bring MiddleMarch, but I just want to know that I'm going to like it, so I'm going to bringLord of the Rings and it it's going to be good. It'sgoing to be familiar, but it's going to be uplifting. It's it's going to bringme to a plate. It's going to be good, so I know I'm going to like it there'sa lot more that I can learn by reading through it again. So there you go lordof the Rings. If there were maybe the complete works of P G Woodhouse, maybeI'd try to put them all together, but just one book will do Lord of the RingsAl Right, Colin! I! U Don't know, I'm just glad. You guys include me in thisbodcast having never read any O baving or Lord of the Rings. Thank you forthat Um, I'm gong to go. I got two more. I got two fiction here, so I'm Gong togo with one of Kevin's least favorite. I'm going to go with wendelberry memoryof Old Jack Collection of short stories there. I would I'd miss home I'd missmy friends, so I live in the agrarian dream somewhere would be. I would be N,I would. I would just you know: Windowbury is appropriately describedas an agrarian, but having growne up on a farm that kind of carried me ofagraanism. So I really what I'm always drawn too with barious is, isDhepiction of community and personalities, and I would miss peopleso memory of Old Jack windlbery adjusting unto you oh stick wit thefiction I had Lord of the rings done as well and for a different, reasontyKevin. I have not read it either. Oh iave read the have outloud door, kidsand I'm I'm Pim Keller would say. I'm a very bad Christian has read like fifty times more than Ihave but get immersed into an imaginative worldand to know that work as well as one could would be worth that. I think yeah that'Dbe, good oud actually dothat in real life too, but yeah. Okay, now you could read those books justgood all right. We got two more books tobring. This is where I'm I'm uncertain,...

...but I want a category something history.I want it to be big. I thought about around Sernaw, something maybe this thewhole Robert Carol Lbj series accounts, but then I'm thinking, Shallbe foot, I haven't read throughall of shelby, foots three volumes calling you're you're 're you'regetting you're getting warm. I know we're a massive churchill biography,but I I'm just thinking as a pastor and thinkingof coming back in six months and so I'm thinking of something church, history, maybe Um the H. I gotHem right here: The thshals Noliran Nick Nidam of Christ power I school, I haven'tread those so Yo W. I read who sto Ganzalas those two volumes, otherpeople read Louderet, but Shaff is dated, but a classic, so so,maybe that I just find a church history that I that's big andlong and can immerse myself in and feel like. I'm learning from the past I'L I'll go with that a shout out toonicknadum, though he doesn't have his all the volumes done, but he's got fourof 'em, Oh God, those Ar Cre S. Relligon, haveyou read him: Justin Uh, gilted, no, but they're good, I've! I've just read one of them year,Rareit, my next! Yes, okay, I'm continuing! I I'll stick with your MI'll. Think. With your theme. There um I'll, go she'll, be foot and I'll gowith volume too, to give the whors thing that', but it'sin a slip cover. You know, yeah, that's true! I'll go with volume too, thoughFederickspurg the Meridian, mainly because it includes stars and theircourses whedges on the GETTISBURG campaign and Um, as I always say aboutshellbefoot, it's not because every historyand agrees with them. It's notbecause Um, I don't. I mean I as just thinkingabout this a lot over the weekend of how history disabuses us of so manydifferent notions. That would be so helpful in comforting us to us todaylike if we knew more history, we'd be more comforted today, because we'drealized that what we thought we knew about the past was wrong and foot is sogreat about just taking you into the drama of history and so can't beat himwhen it comes to a dramatic look at history and again I was thinkingentertainment, so that is entertaining to me just then I'm going to be Kevin Happy with thisone Calvin's institutes, yeah Ilike, to just know that book backwards,andforwards and Crossway has engaged in a process of doing a a new translationfrom scrabwer raking news, yeah, no, no asen't. They in the translation. In his cear time, Ere Somany S, I was going to say,you've got your kids workin yeah they're, just an army of translators,theyrejust minions, I, the Young Institute sweatshop basicallyeredressed up in Knights of templar sort of Regalia ye going Tono. I just you know the to know a work like that and it's youknow if, if the Lord Terris hundreds an more years, that book is still going tobe read and people are going to profit from it so and I would love toeventually see the crossway dish and be done so I can read that if my time awaycoincides with the crosswo publication, Mhm all right last book- I I I don't know, I'm I'm gonna not really answer it, because I justcan't decide. I want to say institutes I might go back to toBroccol. City of God was on my short list. Iwant something want something...

...old that I know as going to be like yousaid just in Soul in Riching, technically proficient Turitin, I think,find that soul in riching, but something else so maybe the institutesit it's it's not it's not the same kind of systematic theology or I thoughtabout a really good Bible commentary. To you know big thick one moo on Romansor one on Genesis, take one of the most important books to the Bible,Genecisizaah Romans and get a dense commentary. So there I just gave you abunch of Oxes, but I'm going to give you a different one. Now come and getsten books. I know hi fire Oa bus, that's the problem, but here's okay.This is what I'll, settlon and I'll take er sinus's commentary on the Eidelbergcatecit. Oh, I got it wrong. OKA CAUSE! I get the Heiduber catechism in there I get theology I get the the heart andthe warmth of it so institutes or Er sinus commentary onCatechism Calin. What e you got for your last one continuing in my theme of Zigging asyou Goy Sag, I'm going to go with volume. Two, theimmigrant series Vilhel Melburg's book, unto a Good Land Story of these sedishimmigration to Minesota. No, what else I was going to pick. Igot a nine hundred page book called Dutch Chicago about all the Dutchsettlers in Chicago, so I'll see your Sweeti armhand! I would. I would enjoythat. I would enjoy reading thatit's a great book actually Okas will on yeah.Well Um. I just think that just going back to imagine what thatexperience was like for people who had never been more than a couple of miles away, fewmiles away from home to cross an ocean to go into a major city to go on atrain across the country into the into the woods on the frontier nativeAmericans, all that sort of stuff and try to make a life for yourself. It'sno onder, it's dramatic and Um, and that's Um. That's what I that's what Iwould enjoy call reading unto a good land that part of the immigrants seriespublished by the Minnesota Historical socit letorica. I'm sure it's very good.It sounds like Thi sort of book. If ESA novel again, not not Anonfif, AndyDufrane had tried to put that in the shashing prison he would have beenkilled. I just think Morgan Freeman would havekilled him yeah ye er books. But Oh it's great. You know anyway. Iappreciate your friendship. Okay, Gowell did you. This is a decide wh. Ihad ligin at Church years ago and doing interview with them one, and I askedhim- you know his his besthis favorite bookman. I have itsome and I was expecting you know cal an something and it was something like the Green Hills of SouthCarolina or some sort of book, and I just a historyof climson football yeah. I was like really and he was waxing on about andthen mehis brother sent me a copy of the book later. I think and H ye if youwant to all things South Carolina history, so I appreciate the rootednessI no would you enjoy AEMEL. I did mout here. Listening to this,it's got a place of honor deep in the shelves. Justd you gotta bring us home. I thinkprobably Kevin's book, Doung, restless and reformed that book is ever green. Never goes out a date out of style. I'm NA cheat on my final answer...

...and say a book that actually doesn'texist with the collected writings of David Pallison. I think I was just reading an essay from one of David's books thismorning on something I'm kind of struggling with. Personally. In everysingle time you open up David's writing. I M N. He he was not a prolific bookauthor. He was a prolific who wasn't even a prolific ssaist, but when hewould write an essay- and it might take him now several months to complete it'sjust it's full of Bible, it's full of wisdom, it's full of insight, Um, it's compassionate, it's courageous, soI don't even think of him pers in terms of kind of the counseling wars, but asa student of scripture and application, the man just had few peers, and so, ifI'm trapped in Tha Shateau for six months H, I want to use the opportunity to do alot of heart work and few people can help me like a David Palasinken. I glad you said Chateau, because Iwould so much rather be there than on a Trena deserisland, so yeah yeah we have.We have options. No, that's great. I mean David Po. How many people can yousay? I've never read something by him that I wasn't helped by and found insightful it just really good good noton. Induson, God bless us one and all we will beback next week, Lord Willing, and then we are anticipating taking sometime offfor the summer. As many of you do and then hopefully h doing a bit of a poncast two point: Ohwith exciting details to come. So the pizza ranches of the world, um Um, sour patch, kids, other sorts ofdelectibles. Anyone looking for to sponsor something that is going throughthe roof h. We are all ears, no we're so glad to have you listening with usand hope to see you next week and until then that you will glorify God, enjoy himforever and read a good book and whatever Shatau you find yourself.

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